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PAST EVENTS

2017
Important Events : UNVEILING: SETH GANGALAL V. MULJI NANDLAL PYAU AT HORNIMAN CIRCLE, FORT
UNVEILING: SETH GANGALAL V. MULJI NANDLAL PYAU AT HORNIMAN CIRCLE, FORT

OFFICIAL LAUNCH OF SETH GANGALAL V. MULJI NANDLAL PYAU AT HORNIMAN CIRCLE, FORT

This project has been initiated under the Fort Management Plan. Seth Gangalal V. Mulji Nandlal Pyau at Horniman Circle was inaugurated on 5th January 2017, by Shri. Ajoy Mehta, Municipal Commissioner of Mumbai

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MEETINGS : Fourth: Brainstorming session on the Mumbai Metropolitan Regional Plan 2036

Brief: The Regional Plan is published once every 20 years and in principle will shape the urban planning future of the Region, which in the case of the Mumbai Metropolitan Region (MMR), encompasses a population of 22.8 million people, including the 12.4 million people living in Greater Mumbai, 7 other Municipal Corporations, 9 Municipal Councils, 35 Census Towns and 994 villages.

Greater Mumbai has peaked and reached its capacity, while the rest of the Region has not seen much growth other than commuter towns which are predominantly dependent on Greater Mumbai for jobs and facilities. Greater Mumbai and the rest of the region have a symbiotic relationship, where the region is seen as the saviour. Hence, if planned properly over the 20-year Plan period, the Region will not only alleviate the issues of Greater Mumbai, but also strategically position itself between Greater Mumbai and the State and Nation.

The Regional Plan must produce an effective strategy where qualitative growth can steer the MMR to such a position, by building on its two main sectors, Finance and Services, and sustain a working population.

Draft Regional Plan: The Draft Mumbai Metropolitan Regional Plan 2016-2036 (Draft RP) and Draft Development Control Regulation 2036, set out under Section 14 of the Maharashtra Regional & Town Planning Act, 1966 (MR&TP Act 1966), were published by the MMRDA on 19th Sept 2016. The original deadline of 18th January 2017 for submission of suggestions/ objections has been extended to 25th April 2017.

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MEETINGS : Third: Brainstorming session on the Mumbai Metropolitan Regional Plan 2036

Brief: The Regional Plan is published once every 20 years and in principle will shape the urban planning future of the Region, which in the case of the Mumbai Metropolitan Region (MMR), encompasses a population of 22.8 million people, including the 12.4 million people living in Greater Mumbai, 7 other Municipal Corporations, 9 Municipal Councils, 35 Census Towns and 994 villages.

Greater Mumbai has peaked and reached its capacity, while the rest of the Region has not seen much growth other than commuter towns which are predominantly dependent on Greater Mumbai for jobs and facilities. Greater Mumbai and the rest of the region have a symbiotic relationship, where the region is seen as the saviour. Hence, if planned properly over the 20-year Plan period, the Region will not only alleviate the issues of Greater Mumbai, but also strategically position itself between Greater Mumbai and the State and Nation.

The Regional Plan must produce an effective strategy where qualitative growth can steer the MMR to such a position, by building on its two main sectors, Finance and Services, and sustain a working population.

Draft Regional Plan: The Draft Mumbai Metropolitan Regional Plan 2016-2036 (Draft RP) and Draft Development Control Regulation 2036, set out under Section 14 of the Maharashtra Regional & Town Planning Act, 1966 (MR&TP Act 1966), were published by the MMRDA on 19th Sept 2016. The original deadline of 18th January 2017 for submission of suggestions/ objections has been extended to 25th April 2017.

Related Project

MEETINGS : Second: Brainstorming session on the Mumbai Metropolitan Regional Plan 2036

Brief: The Regional Plan is published once every 20 years and in principle will shape the urban planning future of the Region, which in the case of the Mumbai Metropolitan Region (MMR), encompasses a population of 22.8 million people, including the 12.4 million people living in Greater Mumbai, 7 other Municipal Corporations, 9 Municipal Councils, 35 Census Towns and 994 villages.

Greater Mumbai has peaked and reached its capacity, while the rest of the Region has not seen much growth other than commuter towns which are predominantly dependent on Greater Mumbai for jobs and facilities. Greater Mumbai and the rest of the region have a symbiotic relationship, where the region is seen as the saviour. Hence, if planned properly over the 20-year Plan period, the Region will not only alleviate the issues of Greater Mumbai, but also strategically position itself between Greater Mumbai and the State and Nation.

The Regional Plan must produce an effective strategy where qualitative growth can steer the MMR to such a position, by building on its two main sectors, Finance and Services, and sustain a working population.

Draft Regional Plan: The Draft Mumbai Metropolitan Regional Plan 2016-2036 (Draft RP) and Draft Development Control Regulation 2036, set out under Section 14 of the Maharashtra Regional & Town Planning Act, 1966 (MR&TP Act 1966), were published by the MMRDA on 19th Sept 2016. The original deadline of 18th January 2017 for submission of suggestions/ objections has been extended to 25th April 2017.

Related Project

MEETINGS : Brainstorming session on the Mumbai Metropolitan Regional Plan 2036

Brief: The Regional Plan is published once every 20 years and in principle will shape the urban planning future of the Region, which in the case of the Mumbai Metropolitan Region (MMR), encompasses a population of 22.8 million people, including the 12.4 million people living in Greater Mumbai, 7 other Municipal Corporations, 9 Municipal Councils, 35 Census Towns and 994 villages.

Greater Mumbai has peaked and reached its capacity, while the rest of the Region has not seen much growth other than commuter towns which are predominantly dependent on Greater Mumbai for jobs and facilities. Greater Mumbai and the rest of the region have a symbiotic relationship, where the region is seen as the saviour. Hence, if planned properly over the 20-year Plan period, the Region will not only alleviate the issues of Greater Mumbai, but also strategically position itself between Greater Mumbai and the State and Nation.

The Regional Plan must produce an effective strategy where qualitative growth can steer the MMR to such a position, by building on its two main sectors, Finance and Services, and sustain a working population.

Draft Regional Plan: The Draft Mumbai Metropolitan Regional Plan 2016-2036 (Draft RP) and Draft Development Control Regulation 2036, set out under Section 14 of the Maharashtra Regional & Town Planning Act, 1966 (MR&TP Act 1966), were published by the MMRDA on 19th Sept 2016. The original deadline of 18th January 2017 for submission of suggestions/ objections has been extended to 25th April 2017.

Related Project

LECTURE : STATE OF HOUSING: INAUGURAL SEMINAR
STATE OF HOUSING: INAUGURAL SEMINAR

Event Date: 3rd and 4th February 2017
Speakers: Kirtee Shah, Sameep Padora, Nuru Karim, Ashok Lall, Hafeez Contractor, Pankaj Joshi, Sharad Mahajan, Sheela Patel, Amita Bhide, Aromar Revi, Gautam Bhan, Alpa Sheth, Prasanna Desai, Swastik Harish, Gautam Chatterjee, Pranay Vakil, Vidyadhar Phatak
Curators: Rahul Mehrotra, Kaiwan Mehta & Ranjit Hoskote
Venue: Max Mueller Bhavan, Mumbai
Book Launch: Sameep Padora’s “IN THE NAME OF HOUSING”
Organised by: The Architecture Foundation and the Urban Design Research Institute

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India is undergoing a rapid urbanization process and one of the key issues emerging out of this process is the delivery of adequate housing and infrastructure to its citizens, especially for its urban poor. Today, there is an urban housing shortage of approximately 20 million units, out of which 57% were for the Economically Weaker sections and 40% for the Low-Income groups – more broadly. It is in this context that the seminar aims to examine the current State of Housing in India.

LECTURE : SSML 2017
SSML 2017

Smart Cities — Organic Cities: Conceptual Conundrums Confronting Indian Urban Planners

The significance of conserving historic cities in India is not only that urban heritage is conserved but also that it provides an appropriate model to plan new settlements. How do we imagine Indian cities — as planned cities like Chandigarh or as organically evolved historic cities like Varanasi or Madurai that need to be nurtured and renewed? Urban conservation offers important lessons to guide the urban planner to manage the consequences of massive urbanisation that is transforming our society and its built environment. The conceptual conundrum confronting Indian urban planners is whether they celebrate Smart Cities or Organic Cities.